codeblog code is freedom — patching my itch

2/18/2011

ptracing siblings

Filed under: Blogging,Debian,Security,Ubuntu,Ubuntu-Server — kees @ 5:29 pm

In Ubuntu, the use of ptrace is restricted. The default allowed relationship between the debugger and the debuggee is that parents are allowed to ptrace their descendants. This means that running “gdb /some/program” and “strace /some/program” Just Works. Using gdb‘s “attach” and strace‘s “-p” options need CAP_SYS_PTRACE, care of sudo.

The next most common use-case was that of crash handlers needing to do a live ptrace of a crashing program (in the rare case of Apport being insufficient). For example, KDE applications have a segfault handler that calls out to kdeinit and requests that the crash handling process be started on it, and then sits in a loop waiting to be attached to. While kdeinit is the parent of both the crashing program (debuggee) and the crash handling program (debugger), the debugger cannot attach to the debugee since they are siblings, not parent/descendant. To solve this, a prctl() call was added so that the debugee could declare who’s descendants were going to attach to it. KDE patched their segfault handler to make the prctl() and everything Just Works again.

Breakpad, the crash handler for Firefox and Chromium, was updated to do effectively the same thing, though they had to add code to pass the process id back to the debuggee since they didn’t have it handy like KDE.

Another use-case was Wine, where for emulation to work correctly, they needed to allow all Wine processes to ptrace each other to correctly emulate Windows. For this, they just declared that all descendants of the wine-server could debug a given Wine process, there-by confining their ptrace festival to just Wine programs.

One of the remaining use-cases is that of a debugging IDE that doesn’t directly use ptrace itself. For example, qtcreator will launch a program and then later attach to it by launching gdb and using the “attach” command. This looks a lot like the crash handler use-case, except that the debuggee doesn’t have any idea that it is running under an IDE. A simple solution for this is to have the IDE run its programs with the LD_PRELOAD environment variable aimed at a short library that just calls prctl() with the parent process id, and suddenly the IDE and its descendants (i.e. gdb) can debug the program all day long.

I’ve got an example of this preloadable library written. If it turns out this is generally useful for IDEs, I could package it up like fakeroot and faketime.

© 2011, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
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2/11/2011

shaping the direction of research

Filed under: Blogging,Debian,Security,Ubuntu,Ubuntu-Server,Vulnerabilities — kees @ 1:45 pm

Other people have taken notice of the recent “auto-run” attack research against Linux. I was extremely excited to see Jon Larimer publishing this stuff, since it ultimately did not start with the words, “first we disabled NX, ASLR, and (SELinux|AppArmor) …”

I was pretty disappointed with last year’s Blackhat conference because so many of the presentations just rehashed ancient exploitation techniques, and very few actually showed new ideas. I got tired of seeing mitigation technologies disabled to accomplish an attack. That’s kind of not the point.

Anyway, Jon’s research is a step in the right direction. He defeats ASLR via brute-force, side-steps NX with ret-to-libc, and finds policy holes in AppArmor to accomplish the goal. I was pleased to see “protected by PIE and AppArmor” in his slides — Ubuntu’s hardening of evince was very intentional. It has proven to be a dangerous piece of software, which Jon’s research just further reinforces. He chose to attack the difficult target instead of going after what might have been the easier thumbnailers.

So, because of this research, we can take a step back and think about what could be done to improve the situation from a proactive security perspective. A few things stand out:

  • GNOME really shouldn’t be auto-mounting anything while the screen is locked (LP: #714958).
  • AppArmor profiles for the other thumbnailers should be written (LP: #715874).
  • The predictable ASLR found in the NX-emulation patch is long over-due to be fixed. This has been observed repeatedly before, but I hadn’t actually opened a bug for it yet. Now I have. (LP: #717412)
  • Media players should be built PIE. This has been on the Roadmap for a while now, but is not as easy as it sounds because several of them use inline assembly for speed, and that can be incompatible with PIE.
  • Consider something like grsecurity’s GRKERNSEC_BRUTE to slow down execution of potentially vulnerable processes. It’s like the 3 second delay between bad password attempts.

Trying to brute-force operational ASLR on a 64bit system, though, would probably not have worked. So, again, I stand by my main recommendation for security: use 64bit. :)

Good stuff; thanks Jon!

© 2011, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
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2/5/2011

fun with game memory

Filed under: Blogging,Debian,General,Reverse Engineering,Ubuntu — kees @ 5:15 pm

So, I was testing a (closed source) single-player offline game recently and thought this exercise might be fun to document. I didn’t want to spend any time actually earning in-game money since I’d played it before and I wanted to just skip ahead to other aspects of the game. I was curious how straight-forward adjusting my cash might be. So, noting the in-game “bank account number” of 219393 and account balance of 3000, I dived right in.

First up, what’s the memory layout of the heap look like? I looked at the brk and the mmap regions without a mapped library or file, marked with “w” in the permissions column, from /proc/PID/maps:

0827e000-08282000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
0a22e000-0b08a000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 [heap]
efa59000-efd00000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
efd00000-efd21000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0

Knowing these, I could use gdb’s “find” command, after attaching to the process:

$ gdb /some/cool/game

(gdb) attach PID

(gdb) find /w 0x0827e000, 0×08282000, 219393
(gdb) find /w 0x0a22e000, 0x0b08a000, 219393
0xaf03d08
0xaf06ca8

No hits in the first region, but I see two hits for the account number value in the second region. Let’s start there and see what’s near them…

(gdb) x/8x 0xaf03d08
0xaf03d08: 0×00035901 0×00000000 0×00000000 0x0af06ce0
0xaf03d18: 0x0af06be0 0×00000059 0x0af03d98 0x0af041e8
(gdb) x/8x 0xaf06ca8
0xaf06ca8: 0×00035901 0x00000bb8 0x00000bb8 0x0820b148
0xaf06cb8: 0×00000001 0×00000000 0×00000000 0×00000000

In that second hit, I see the value 0xBB8, which is 3000, and matches our account balance. Let’s see what happens if we just change both of those to add a bit a few orders of magnitude above the current value…

(gdb) set var *0xaf06cac = 0x00100bb8
(gdb) set var *0xaf06cb0 = 0x00100bb8
(gdb) x/32x 0xaf06cac
0xaf06cac: 0x00100bb8 0x00100bb8 0x0820b148 0×00000001
(gdb) continue

And presto, clicking on the bank account details in-game shows a huge account balance of 1051576 now. No need to reverse-engineer any saved games, whew.

© 2011, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
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