codeblog code is freedom — patching my itch

1/22/2012

fixing vulnerabilities with systemtap

Filed under: Blogging,Debian,Security,Ubuntu,Ubuntu-Server,Vulnerabilities — kees @ 3:22 pm

Recently the upstream Linux kernel released a fix for a serious security vulnerability (CVE-2012-0056) without coordinating with Linux distributions, leaving a window of vulnerability open for end users. Luckily:

  • it is only a serious issue in 2.6.39 and later (e.g. Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric)
  • it is “only” local
  • it requires execute access to a setuid program that generates output

Still, it’s a cross-architecture local root escalation on most common installations. Don’t stop reading just because you don’t have a local user base — attackers can use this to elevate privileges from your user, or from the web server’s user, etc.

Since there is now a nearly-complete walk-through, the urgency for fixing this is higher. While you’re waiting for your distribution’s kernel update, you can use systemtap to change your kernel’s running behavior. RedHat suggested this, and here’s how to do it in Debian and Ubuntu:

  • Download the “am I vulnerable?” tool, either from RedHat (above), or a more correct version from Brad Spengler.
  • Check if you’re vulnerable:
    $ make correct_proc_mem_reproducer
    ...
    $ ./correct_proc_mem_reproducer
    vulnerable
    
  • Install the kernel debugging symbols (this is big — over 2G installed on Ubuntu) and systemtap:
    • Debian:
      # apt-get install -y systemtap linux-image-$(uname -r)-dbg
      
    • Ubuntu:
      • Add the debug package repository and key for your Ubuntu release:
        $ sudo apt-get install -y lsb-release
        $ echo "deb http://ddebs.ubuntu.com/ $(lsb_release -cs) main restricted universe multiverse" | \
              sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ddebs.list
        $ sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys ECDCAD72428D7C01
        $ sudo apt-get update
        
      • (This step does not work since the repository metadata isn’t updating correctly at the moment — see the next step for how to do this manually.) Install the debug symbols for the kernel and install systemtap:
        sudo apt-get install -y systemtap linux-image-$(uname -r)-dbgsym
        
      • (Manual version of the above, skip if the above works for you. Note that this has no integrity checking, etc.)
        $ sudo apt-get install -y systemtap dpkg-dev
        $ wget http://ddebs.ubuntu.com/pool/main/l/linux/$(dpkg -l linux-image-$(uname -r) | grep ^ii | awk '{print $2 "-dbgsym_" $3}' | tail -n1)_$(dpkg-architecture -qDEB_HOST_ARCH).ddeb
        $ sudo dpkg -i linux-image-$(uname -r)-dbgsym.ddeb
        
  • Create a systemtap script to block the mem_write function, and install it:
    $ cat > proc-pid-mem.stp <<'EOM'
    probe kernel.function("mem_write@fs/proc/base.c").call {
            $count = 0
    }
    EOM
    $ sudo stap -Fg proc-pid-mem.stp
    
  • Check that you’re no longer vulnerable (until the next reboot):
    $ ./correct_proc_mem_reproducer
    not vulnerable
    

In this case, the systemtap script is changing the argument containing the size of the write to zero bytes ($count = 0), which effectively closes this vulnerability.

UPDATE: here’s a systemtap script from Soren that doesn’t require the full debug symbols. Sneaky, put can be rather slow since it hooks all writes in the system. :)

© 2012, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
Creative Commons License

Powered by WordPress